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Five Everyday Tips to Help Prevent Acid Reflux

Do you experience acid reflux often? We have some daily tips to add to your routine for GERD Awareness Week (November 17–23). Check them out now!

November 21, 2019 | HF Healthy Living Team

Acid reflux occurs when excess stomach acid moves up through the esophagus (throat). It’s often referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Usually, this term is used only if you experience acid reflux more than twice a week.

Twenty percent of people in the U.S. suffer from GERD, and it’s important to get treatment to prevent more serious health complications. Be sure to speak to your doctor if you experience acid reflux often.

Click the photos below to find out how to minimize acid reflux with these easy-to-follow tips.

Try New Healthy Foods
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Try New Healthy Foods

 

Try New Healthy Foods
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It’s important to maintain a healthy weight, especially with GERD. One way to do this is by adding nutritious foods to your diet. Foods that have been proven to prevent acid reflux are ginger, healthy fats like those in avocados, non-citrus fruits like bananas and melons, lean meats and seafood, vegetables like cauliflower and cucumber, and whole grains like oatmeal.

 

Know Your Triggers
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Know Your Triggers

 

Know Your Triggers
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Many people with acid reflux can experience heartburn, sore throat, burping, or difficulty swallowing, so be aware of your unique symptoms. High-fat foods can trigger GERD, but everyone’s triggers or sensitivities are different. Keep a food diary to help track what’s right for you. Drinks such as coffee, alcohol, and soda are common triggers as well.

 

Reboot Your Eating Habits
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Reboot Your Eating Habits

 

Reboot Your Eating Habits
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Do you drink liquids while eating? This can impair digestion, so try to drink between meals instead. Remember to eat slowly by chewing your food well, too. Doing so will help you digest foods easier, making acid reflux less likely. Don’t lie down or slouch right after a meal—wait at least two hours. Be sure to avoid eating for at least three to four hours before bed as well.

 

Wear Loose-fitting Clothing
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Wear Loose-fitting Clothing

 

Wear Loose-fitting Clothing
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It’s important to avoid wearing tight pants, belts, or other constraining clothing around your abdomen to help prevent GERD. Tight clothing around the stomach can push acid into your throat, where it doesn’t belong. Loose-fitting clothing will help to encourage proper digestive function.

 

Change Your Sleep Routine
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Change Your Sleep Routine

 

Change Your Sleep Routine
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Acid reflux, or GERD, can get worse when you lie down. It’s important to sleep in a position that keeps stomach acid in the right place. Nighttime acid reflux can be more dangerous, because stomach acid can come into contact with the esophagus for many hours and damage the tissue. Try to prop pillows under your head so it’s raised about six to eight inches for relief.

 
 

© 2019 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“Treatment for GER & GERD,” National Institute of Diabetes. Accessed November 1, 2019.
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/treatment

“Heartburn and GERD,” National Institutes of Health. December 13, 2019.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279254/

“Management of Nighttime Gastroesophageal…,” National Institutes of Health. August, 2007.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3099296/

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